The Most Diabolical Person I Have Ever Written About

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Over a span of 2 ½ years and 352 stories, I have never written of anyone more diabolical, more sadistic than James Cahill.

See if you agree.

In April, 1998 he took an aluminum baseball bat and bashed his wife Jill Cahill in the head and other places repeatedly.

This was in front of their 9 and 10-year old children.

I’m sure the baseball bat was there because the boy, not sure whether he was 9 or 10, played youth baseball. A more pleasant time in the Cahill household, if there ever was one.

Jill should have died right then, that very moment,

She was rushed to the hospital, and time and time again she survived numerous surgeries, and many ups and downs of her physical condition that could have deteriorated at any time, and she still would have died.

James Cahill was released on $100,000 bond to await his trial on the brutal attack.  Exactly what does someone have to do to have a $10,000,000 bond that keeps them in jail?  Nobody thought he was capable of doing anything else? How much sadism does one have to display to indicate there may be a psychopath here?

In October, 1998, her husband, dressed as one of the janitorial staff with a mop in hand went into her room undetected, stuffed cyanide down her throat, and this time murdered her.

Six months he had to plan premeditated murder.  Six months. Remember that as you read on.

He used a fake letterhead he had made up of a local company that possibly used cyanide, ordered the cyanide, and followed the UPS truck around until it stopped. He approached the driver and said he was an employee of that company, signed for the cyanide, and drove away. Not, however, before the UPS driver got his tag number and passed it along to his UPS boss and the police.

The truck he was driving belonged to his brother, according to the ID TV program, and yet the police didn’t connect the name Cahill with the most severe attack of a wife in their city or county or probably New York State itself.

That alone would have saved Jill’s life.

I noticed that some of the nurses who were on duty at the time Cahill made his fatal journey into the hospital commented that he wasn’t dressed properly as one of the janitorial staff.  In fact some even noted he had on a terrible looking wig

Why didn’t they report it, and go check on Jill?  I have no idea. Maybe because they thought her husband could not get into the hospital, go to Jill’s room, and kill her with cyanide.

Jill had to stand out as an unprecedented individual in all of their years of nursing. A beating like they had never seen before in their entire careers and yet survived.  Why did they think this oddly dressed person, almost gawky, was there?  The nurses only had to take a few steps down the hall to check on Jill.

You think that is the worst that happened to Jill Cahill? While she was alive, yes. After she died, no.

Read on.

When James Cahill went to trial, the prosecutor sought the death penalty, on 1st degree murder which is almost unprecedented in the state of New York.

The jury thought the crime was so heinous, they agreed with the prosecutor, and gave James Cahill the death sentence.

End of story?

Keep reading.

James Cahill’s attorney applied to the New York Court of Appeals. They reduced his sentence to 2nd degree murder, and sent it back to the judge in the original trial for re-sentencing.

I’ve never heard of this before, but it is the law in New York.  In order for someone to be convicted of 1st degree murder, the murderer must commit a second offense at the time of the murder.  For example, Cahill had to be doing something else wrong that had nothing to do with the 1st degree murder, in order to be convicted of 1st degree murder. Burglary could have been the second crime.  He possibly came up with the janitorial clothes someplace else, but I’ll bet the mop he was carrying with him was stolen from the janitorial supply room, and that should have been a second crime.   The Court of Appeals was operating off a stupid law, and the mop was a stupid way to charge burglary, but why not? The Court of Appeals didn’t do it, only me.

1st degree murder should stand alone as a crime, and prosecuted alone in association with nothing else. How the judges on the Court of Appeals made the decision, and went home at night and slept, I am just not smart enough to comprehend.

I don’t remember exactly how the Appeals Court decided, maybe 4-2, but if those four told their spouses the way they decided, I’d think their spouses reminded them of what James Cahill did to his wife, not once but twice.

The original trial judge had his say in court before he resentenced James Cahill to the max he could, which was 37 ½ years. He certainly told everyone in court what vicious acts Cahill had committed

After the beating with a baseball bat, Jill Cahill fought for her life in a Syracuse hospital for about six months, until James Cahill came calling on that fatal night.

A valiant fight that I am sure had days where she thought she would die. Yet according to the ID TV program, she had begun to have hope, to return to live with her parents and have wonderful days with her sister, and to start over again after divorcing James Cahill.

Her sister raised the two children. Her sister, Debbie Jaeger, who was interviewed on the program, struck me as a person who would have done everything she could to raise them in the same manner that Jill would have done. For you who have raised children, you have probably had enough trying times with your own children, and for Debbie to be able to do that with Jill in mind, is only short of a miracle.

For those stupid legislators in a liberal state to pass a law that 1st degree murder can only carry a conviction if a second crime is committed at the time, has to be one of the dumbest things ever, even for a liberal.

The law is so stupid, I can’t believe it’s even on the books.

Maybe they changed the law after Jill was murdered, you may as well say twice.

A lot of good that would have done Jill afterwards.

James Cahill will be eligible for parole in like 2036. Jill’s sister will have to haul herself down to the Pardons and Parole Board to prevent them from paroling Cahill by spelling out for them in graphic detail what he did—TWICE.

The prosecutor in the original trial had it right, but the court system after that has been so cruel to Jill, the Pardons and Parole Board will probably let him go with the commendation that he has been a model citizen in the penitentiary.

He probably didn’t have an aluminum baseball bat handy in the penitentiary.  His behavior might not have been so model.

 

2 comments

  • I wonder if surely he was breaking some sort of restraining order in place. I would hope he was not supposed to be allowed to be anywhere near her. Would that have not have been the second crime?

    • Thanks for your comment.

      A restraining order is not worth the paper it’s written on. It would only work if a policeman or policelady could have been at Jill’s front door 24/7.

      You are correct. A second charge could have been brought for the first crime of attempted murder. However the prosecutor went for death in the trial when Cahill was tried for 1st degree murder and got it. If he had been executed as he should have been, he can only be dead once.

      Even though Cahill is sitting in the penitentiary now, the prosecutor could still try him for attempted murder, unless there is some quirk in NY law I am not aware of. Trying him for attempted murder is not double jeopardy. A conviction would add time to his current sentence, unless the trial judge in the attempted murder case decided the two sentences would be served concurrently, instead of consecutively. If the judge decided the additional time would be served concurrently, the trial on attempted murder would not have been worth the effort.

      The stupidity in all of this was the $100,000 bond. It should have been high enough to keep him in jail until his trial on attempted murder. How could the judge be so stupid? He should have gone to the hospital to look at Jill before he decided on the amount of the bond.